A Life-Size Human Model, 3D Printed on 88 Printers in Under 24 Hours

June 10th, 2016 by

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For Mother’s Day this year, you could have given your mom a $30,000 3D printed model of ‘you’ if you cashed in on the viral Groupon offer. The idea was that you could give your mother the ever-lasting gift of your presence, or at least something to occupy your now-empty childhood bedroom. While this was a unique one-time promotion, making full-size custom mannequins is actually possible, and costs only a fraction of the hefty Groupon price tag. To prove this out Voodoo Manufacturing teamed up with NYC-based startup, Body Labs, to build an economical end-to-end pipeline for 3D printing life-sized human bodies in our Brooklyn 3D printing factory.

Body Labs makes highly-sophisticated software for interpreting human body shape and pose by translating raw 3D scans, or basic measurements, into 3D digital body models. In essence, they’ve built a way to take unprocessed 3D scans of people that may be noisy or incomplete, and turn them into fully semantic, clean models of your actual body shape. There are many applications for Body Labs’ technology beyond making 3D printed mannequins, such as predictive health tracking, advanced clothing design, mass product customization, virtual simulation, and more.
Body Labs

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Will Food 3D Printing Really Become a “Thing”?

May 16th, 2016 by

This article originally appeared on VentureBeat on April 17, 2016. 

“Food 3D printing” is something of a mythical creature. It’s been talked about a lot, and there have been a few sightings of it, but no one’s quite sure if it’s real or not. Well, I think it’s about time someone takes a shot at cracking open the case.

In essence, food 3D printing is this: you take a standard 3D printer, replace the non-edible material (like plastic filament) with something edible, and voilà, you have a food 3D printer! In reality though, the results have been less than amazing. What you typically get with a food 3D printer is a purée of perfectly good food extruded into an odd-looking shape. Today there are a few companies trying to pave the food 3D printing path.

The PancakeBot machine. Image Credit: Kickstarter

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